Posts Tagged ‘cornedbeef’

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!


 

 

 

Did You Know…

  • Irish is the nation’s second most frequently reported ancestry, ranking behind German
  • Corned beef and cabbage is a traditional St. Patrick’s Day dish. In 2009, roughly 26.1 billion pounds of beef and 2.3 billion pounds of cabbage were produced in the United States.
  • If you happen to love this tradition however restrict you consumption of beef, try using Seitan. Preparing it a manner similar to corned beef will beΒ surprisingly delicious and Β is a great source of protein, without the fat and cholesterol.

    Corned Beef Seitan

    Seitan is prepared using Β vital wheat gluten that is sold in natural food stores and some large supermarkets in sacks, much like flour. Vital wheat gluten contains approximately 75 percent protein and is great for a balanced diet.

    • 2 cups vital wheat gluten, see Note
    • 3 tablespoons ground pickling spice for meat (I use Morton or Basset brands)
    • 2 tablespoons onion powder
    • 1 tablespoon smoked paprika
    • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1 cup vegetable broth
    • Β½ cup vegetable oil
    • 1 Β½ tablespoons light soy sauce
    • 1 Β½ tablespoons real maple syrup
    • 1 tablespoon apple cider vinegar
    • 12 ounces dark or stout beer
    • 1 cup chopped celery
    • 1 cup chopped carrot
    • 1 cup chopped onion
    • 2 bay leaves
    1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the wheat gluten, pickling spice, onion powder, paprika, garlic powder, and salt.
    2. In another bowl, whisk together the broth, oil, soy sauce, syrup, and vinegar. Pour the mixture into the mixing bowl with the dry ingredients and stir until the dough is well blended.
    3. Using damp hands, shape the dough into a loaf about 1 Β½-inches thick. Wrap in a double layer of cheesecloth, twist the ends closed and tie with butcher’s twine.
    4. Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan, combine about 1 gallon of water with the beer, celery, carrots, onion, and bay leaves and bring to a simmer over medium heat.
    5. Lower the loaf into the simmering liquid and cook for about 1 hour and 15 minutes, turning the loaf occasionally. Adjust the heat up or down to maintain the simmer.
    6. Remove the seiten from the simmering liquid and let it rest for about 15 minutes. Unwrap the seiten and transfer to a plate. Refrigerate for at least 45 minutes before slicing.

    Who is St. Patrick and What did he do?

    St. Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland, is one of Christianity’s most widely known figures.

    At the age of sixteen, Patrick was taken prisoner by a group of Irish raiders who were attacking his family’s estate. They transported him to Ireland where he spent six years in captivity.Β Lonely and afraid, he turned to his religion for solace, becoming a devout Christian.

    Patrick escaped. According to his writing, a voice-which he believed to be God’s-spoke to him in a dream, telling him it was time to leave Ireland.

    Patrick reported that he experienced a second revelation-an angel in a dream tells him to return to Ireland as a missionary. Soon after, Patrick began religious training, a course of study that lasted more than fifteen years. After his ordination as a priest, he was sent to Ireland with a dual mission-to minister to Christians already living in Ireland and to begin to convert the Irish.

    Read more…http://www.history.com/topics/who-was-saint-patrick